THINGS TO DO ON THE ISLE OF SKYE

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SKYEFARI

One of the very best ways to see the iconic landscapes and wildlife of Skye — a great day out for family bubble groups or couples. Join us on a fully-guided wildlife-watching adventure in our 4x4 Mercedes Sprinter minibus. Your guide/driver, David, is a highly experienced ecologist, who knows the area and its wildlife hotspots intimately. Ready to start exploring? View our trips here. 

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Old Man of Storr

An iconic landmark, the Old Man of Storr is a hill located on the isle's Trotternish peninsula. Starting from the A855, just north of Loch Leathan, the well-pathed 2.75 mile route takes approximately two hours to complete. Once at the top, the views overlooking the Sound of Raasay and Scotland's mainland are breathtaking.

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The Quiraing

Make sure to visit this world-famous beauty spot during your visit to Skye. Located on the eastern face of Meall na Suiramach, take a trip up to the north of the isle to complete this 2 mile hill circuit. With just a 374m ascent, this walk is accessible for almost all hiking levels. But watch out! Don't let the dreamy, spectacular views all-round distract you too much.

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Dunvegan Castle

First built in the 13th Century, Dunvegan Castle has undergone several notable architectural changes throughout the centuries. Nestled atop of elevated rock, the castle enjoys views overlooking Loch Dunvegan — a stunning sea loch. Book your visit to the estate and its events today!

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Dinosaur Footprints at Brother's Point

Discover the most recently uncovered set of dinosaur footprints on the Isle of Skye, created 170 million years ago by sauropods and therapods. Located at Rubha nam Brathairean (Brother’s Point) on the Trotternish Peninsula, these prints are best viewed on a SKYEFARI adventure — click here to book today. 

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Kilt Rock

Located on the Trotternish Peninsula, Kilt Rock makes the grand Mealt Falls even more impressive — plummeting a staggering 90 metres right into the Sound of Raasay. Look out for it as you cruise along the Hebridean Whale Trail with Hebridean Adventures: one of the best places in Scotland for spotting cetaceans. 

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Fairy Pools

At the foot of the Black Cuillins, near Glenbrittle, you’ll find the ethereal Fairy Pools. While the vivid aqua pools certainly resemble a home for mythical beings, these pool formations were the product of volcanic activity 50-70 million years ago. Today, they are now home to a plethora of animals, such as red deer, rabbits and sheep. 

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Fairy Glen

The fairies really have been busy on this wee isle... Despite no actual connection to fairy folklore, the mystical conical hills of the Fairy Glen certainly look the part. You can either take the suggested 1.5 mile path, or wander through the unique site as you please. It’s a place for exploration, after all.